Health Care-Associated Infections (HAI)

HQI Toolkit

Eliminating Surgical Site Infections (SSIs)

SSI is an infection that develops within 30 days after an operation or within one year if an implant was placed and the infection appears to be related to the surgery. Post-operative SSIs are the most common healthcare-associated infection in surgical patients, occurring in up to 5 percent of surgical patients.

This HQI toolkit will assist hospitals in measuring surgical site infection (SSI), identifying and engaging key stakeholders, providing harm elimination tools that work, and learning through the success of other hospitals.

HQI Toolkit

Eliminating Central Line-associated Bloodstream Infection (CLABSI)

A central line-associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) is a laboratory-confirmed blood stream infection that is not secondary to an infection at another site in patients where a central line or umbilical catheter was in place at the time of the infection.

This HQI toolkit will assist hospitals in measuring central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), identifying and engaging key stakeholders, providing harm elimination tools that work, and learning through the success of other hospitals.

HQI Toolkit

Eliminating Ventilator-associated Events (VAE) and Ventilator-associated Pneumonia (VAP/VAE)

Pneumonia occurring more than 48 hours after patients have been intubated and received mechanical ventilation.

This HQI toolkit will assist hospitals in measuring ventilator-associated events (VAE), including ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), identifying and engaging key stakeholders, providing harm elimination tools that work, and learning through the success of other hospitals.

HQI Toolkit

Eliminating Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection (CAUTI)

Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI), the most common Health Care Acquired Infection in US hospitals, increase risk of patient morbidity and mortality, with attributable deaths estimated to be over 13,000 annually. Prevention guidelines indicate that practices centered on removing indwelling catheters as soon as possible should result in a sustained decrease in UTIs.

This HQI toolkit will assist hospitals in measuring CAUTI rates, identifying and engaging key stakeholders, providing harm elimination tools that work, and learning through the success of other hospitals.

Post

Clostridium difficile Also known as C. diff and CDIC Infection (CDI) Change Package
AHA/HRET

The prevention of Clostridium difficile transmission and infection is an urgent patient safety challenge. Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that over 14,000 people die of CDI in the United States every year, the actual number of deaths may be much higher. According to data from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, more than 9 percent of C. difficile-related hospitalizations end in death (a rate nearly five times higher than for other conditions).

General Information

Hand Hygiene
Infection Control

Hand hygiene can prevent infections from spreading from one patient to another, as well as from patient to health care worker.

The CHPSO website offers an array of hand hygiene tools and suggestions to encourage better hand washing throughout the community.